Make your own free website on Tripod.com
News and Info
Home | WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES--2010 | WEG 2010--Misc. | NEW PAGE--INTERNET videostreams of horse shows and auctions | CLONING update060709 | USDF/USEF Proposed Qualifying Standards--WITHDRAWN Dec. 2009 | FEI Dressage Committee Controversy--2008 | FEI Dressage Committee Controversy--2008 page 2 | 2007 Preakness winner Legal Controversy | 2008 Olympics in China--AUGUST 2008 | American Horse Council 2005 study on Economic Impact of Horse Industry in US | Calendar | Copyright Law--US | CLONING in the equine industry | Creating DVD's from VHS tapes | Dressage News | Eclipse Awards for Racing (TB and AQHA) | Horse Health Watch | HOW TO make a sale video | HOW TO: Take a basic conformation picture of a horse | Links for Equestrian Gifts | Links for videos, DVD's and CD's | Links for Technology | Links--Equipment and Supplies | Links for Information, Breed Associations and News | Links to Radio-TV-Internet broadcasts | Market Trends and Sales | Marketing--Demographic and Survey Information | Marketing Tools for Owners-Sellers | Misc. Info | News and Info ARCHIVE | Oxygen Therapy for Horses--2005 | Plants and Flowers that are Toxic to Horses | QH--Appendix Quarterhorses-AQHA Judging and other news | QH--American Quarter Horse News | Recommended Books for Equine related information and issues | RIDING: Dismounted Exercises to Improve your Riding | Significant Rule Changes | Sporthorse Breeding--an Intro | Television and Horses | TOBA 2005 TASK FORCE ON ETHICS | Travel Notes | United States Federal Law changes on Travel Policy since 2005 | Welfare of Equine Survey--2004

CLONING in the equine industry

Cloning of horses has become a reality!
Read below for some of the results from initial efforts, the controversies surrounding such, and links to the companies that are commercializing this process for their point of view.

Following are some resources from equine sources on cloning horses:
 

 

Have Your Horse Cloned
Equine cloning is now a viable option as two companies offer commercial cloning services.

A clone of cutting horse wonder, Royal Blue Boon, was born in February 2006.
Photo by Sally Harrison

Two companies, Clone2, of Moscow, Idaho, and ViaGen, Inc., of Austin, Texas, now offer commercial equine cloning services.

Working with the University of Idaho team that cloned three mules in 2003, Clone2 charges a flat fee of $367,000 for a cloning attempt, plus royalties for resulting foals. To produce two or three clones, the scientists implant eggs with the desired DNA in about 100 mares.

"Based on our work with the mules, we had a foaling rate of about 2.65 percent," says Dirk Vanderwall, DVM, PhD, of the university's Northwest Equine Reproduction Laboratory. "But as we develop the technology, we expect the number [of clones produced] to increase."

Viagen, a company known primarily for cloning cattle and swine, is now offering horse clones in partnership with Encore Genetics, an equine marketing firm. According to ViaGen president Mark Walton, PhD, the company has already begun cloning several performance Quarter Horses.

ViaGen/Encore Genetics charges $150,000 for a single clone, and says Walton, "We will give it our best effort to deliver a foal. If we are not successful in the first attempt, we will make additional attempts."

This article originally appeared in the November 2005 issue of EQUUS magazine. Share your thoughts on cloning in the EQUUS forum.

 

 

 

 

 

Find this article at:
http://www.equisearch.com/horses_care/health/breeding/horsecloning_122006

 

 

 Check the box to include the list of links referenced in the article.

 

 

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Horse Cloning Opportunity Opens to Public
Horsecloning.com opened a horse cloning opportunity to the public and announced the cost. Only one slot is available this year with a deadline of August 15.

Source: PRNewswire

July 29, 2005 -- Cloning your horse will cost you $367,350 plus a patent royalty fee of 15% based on the number of clones produced and their estimated value, according to Peter Kagel, founder and president of horsecloning.com.

Kagel estimates that for your money you could end up with 0 to 16 clones.

The same University of Idaho team, headed by the renowned Gordon Woods, PhD, which successfully cloned 3 mules in 2003, will perform the cloning. (Read EQUUS magazine's How Researchers Cloned the First Equid)

"It's a bit of a gamble with a huge potential payoff," said Kagel. "Because while there are no guarantees, and on the bottom end you could end up with no clones, on the top end it is estimated, due to advances in science and cloning protocols since 2003, that you could end up with 16 clones from the 100 mares that will be impregnated with your horse's DNA. So if the horse you are cloning is worth $100,000 you could end up with a tidy profit of over $1,000,000 or thereabouts. That's a lot more money than your stallion or mare is likely to produce over several breeding seasons, plus you don't know the quality of horse you will get from breeding.

"Horse cloning is the wave of the future. People are only going to clone quality horses, the top-of-the-bloodline champions. Eventually cloning will allow today's economically unattainable horse to be purchased by the middle-class horse aficionado.

article continues below


"There will come a time when the ban on racing cloned horses will be lifted because breeders will realize that they will make a lot more money cloning and racing the clones rather than just breeding non-clones, which, after all, is nothing more than an expensive grand experiment that usually falls flat," Kagel continued. "One of Dr. Woods' cloned mules will be on the mule racing circuit next year. The genie is working his way out of the bottle.

"It makes sense to clone Funny Cide who won the 2003 Kentucky Derby and almost won the Triple Crown. He was gelded and what a waste. His clones would be fertile and their offspring most likely would continue his bloodline of incredibly fast competitive horses. The evidence is solid that clones appear to be normal, have the ability to bear offspring and live just as long if not longer than regularly bred animals."

"We only have the capacity this year to clone one horse, and the deadline for putting money down is August 15, so it's 'first come, first served,'" Kagel continued. "This is because the sun governs the cloning season, and we're starting late. Most importantly, we are not just talking about racehorses for this one-time opportunity--far from it. We are talking about cloning incredible Peruvian Pasos, champion cutting horses, Lipizzans, Palominos, Arabians, Hanoverians, Norwegian Fjords, Clydesdales, champion jumpers and what-have-you."

According to Kagel, inquiries should be made through horsecloning.com.


 
 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

http://www.typepad.com/t/trackback/6847757 November 16, 2006

Horse Cloning Continues

This recent turn to cloning horses should make the future years of horse racing even more exciting.  I realize some horse owners may think that this is unfair (and certainly those that were looking forward to using their retired horses as a means to bring in money from "stud fees" may be disappointed) but for the rest of us - how exciting that we may be able to see the same horses run over and over again. . .  .  The AP reports,

Barrel racer Charmayne James knew scientists had figured out how to clone mice, sheep and cats. But if any creature deserved to be cloned, she thought it was her gelding Scamper, the retired 10-time world champion. The result, Clayton, has exceeded James' expectations. The foal even bristles, just like Scamper, when touched on a certain spot behind his ear.

"Scamper was one of the greatest horses ever, and I know that now more than ever," James said. "I wanted to get in and save his genetics, because if they were ever able to clone a horse, Scamper would be the horse to clone."

James paid an Austin-based ViaGen Inc. $150,000 to clone Scamper. After four failed attempts, Clayton was born Aug. 8. His birth had been kept secret until Wednesday.

Genetic material was extracted from a cell sample taken from Scamper, then transferred to an egg that had its own genetic material removed. An embryo was grown in an incubator before it was transferred to a mare. . .

Scamper won a record 10 Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association world championships from 1984 to '93 and helped make James the first million-dollar cowgirl and the all-time leading money winner in barrel racing. Scamper is the only barrel racing horse in the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame.

James, who lives in Athens, Texas, plans to breed Clayton to help "get better, sounder quality barrel horses out there." For now, she has no plans to race Clayton, saying he's to valuable to risk getting hurt.

The PRCA has no limits on using cloned horses in competition, but Clayton wouldn't be allowed in any events sponsored by the American Quarter Horse Association, which does not register horses that are cloned or their offspring.

The first cloned horse was born in 2003 in Italy. In 2005 Texas A&M University created the first cloned horse in the United States. Earlier this year, ViaGen announced it had cloned two top-earning cutting horses in Oklahoma.

$150,000 for a cloned horse!  I guess that could be seen as a bargain since cloning your cat could cost approximately $50,000.  It is rather surprising that this horse story does not discuss the potential medical harms to the clone as well as ethical concerns surrounding the entire issue of cloning. 

November 16, 2006 | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/31/business/31clone.html?ex=1171947600&en=2e860d440992656e&ei=5070

 

March 31, 2006

Goodbye Dolly: Up From Sheep to Cloned Horses

By ANDREW POLLACK

Royal Blue Boon was a champion and big money-earner in the equine calf-herding sport known as cutting. Comes now her genetic knock-off: Royal Blue Boon Too, whose birth last month was, her creators say, the start of commercial horse cloning.

The births of Too and the clone of a second star cutting mare, Tap O Lena, were announced yesterday by two Texas companies — ViaGen, a cloning company, and Encore Genetics, a horse-breeding and marketing company. Seven more clones of champion horses are scheduled to be born this year, the companies said.

While there have been at least three horses cloned before this, the companies portrayed the new ones as the first commercially cloned horses, though a French company played at least some role in earlier clones.

The companies are charging $150,000 for the first clone and $90,000 for a second clone of the same animal. Clones are genetic copies of the original, though they might not be the same in all details because the environment influences how genes act.

ViaGen is hoping that horses can ride to the rescue of the cloning business. The cloning of cows and pigs, which could be a bigger business, has been set back by the Food and Drug Administration, which has yet to make a ruling that the milk and meat of cloned animals, and their more conventionally bred offspring, are safe to consume.

"We see horses as being an achievable business now that doesn't have a regulatory process associated with it," Mark Walton, the chief executive of ViaGen, said in an interview.

The F.D.A. decision on food safety, which is bound to be controversial, was rumored to be coming last fall but was put off, and it is not clear when it will come.

In the meantime, the F.D.A. has asked owners of cloned animals to keep the meat and milk out of the food supply. Some farmers and breeders who have invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in cloning their prized livestock have thus had to pour milk down the drain or store semen in vats, unable to sell it.

Even though horses do not present a food safety issue, at least in this country, horse cloning is still somewhat controversial. The Humane Society of the United States issued a statement yesterday criticizing the two Texas companies for "subjecting horses to commercial exploitation through cloning," which it said had no "legitimate social value." It said there was a high failure rate in cloning and that clones could have birth defects and illnesses.

Mr. Walton said the two clones ViaGen made, both born on a farm in Purcell, Okla., appeared to be healthy.

Some people in the horse world are also wary of cloning, in part because they think conventional breeding is better for the future of the horses and sports. The Jockey Club, which is in charge of registration of thoroughbred racehorses, does not allow cloning. The same is true for the American Quarter Horse Association.

But the National Cutting Horse Association has no such prohibition, according to a statement from an official. Cutting is an event in which a horse and rider separate a single calf from its herd and then block the calf from returning.

Royal Blue Boon won more than $380,000 in her career and her offspring, including Red White and Boon, Autumn Boon and Peptoboonsmal, have won more than $2.5 million more. She is now 26, past her cutting and reproductive years, so her owner, Elaine Hall of Weatherford, Tex., decided to have her cloned.

"The motivation for me to do it in the first place was to be able to preserve the superior genes that my mare has," Ms. Hall said in a telephone press conference organized by ViaGen.

ViaGen, based in Austin, is controlled by John Sperling, an octogenarian billionaire who started the profit-making University of Phoenix. He has put his money into other causes as well, like the attempted cloning of his own dog and other pets, anti-aging research, and the decriminalization of marijuana, particularly for medical uses.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

 

http://www.ereleases.com/pr/20050801011.html

http://www.equestrianmag.com/news/horse-cloning-peter-kagel.html

Press Release

Horsecloning.com Announces Royality Fees Will Replace Stud Fees for Cloned Horses

Jockey Clubs' Rules Predicted to Fall; The One-Slot Cloning Deadline Is August 15

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 1, 2005 -- "Breeders should be delighted to embrace the horse cloning revolution," stated Peter Kagel, President of http://www.horsecloning.com, "because instead of receiving just a one-time stud fee or a breeding fee for a mare, they can negotiate for future royalties, just like a patent owner, should the clones they sell be either cloned themselves and/or procreate through breeding and/or generate revenue through competitions."

"The insightful horse owner who purchases the only horse cloning slot available for the entire world this season will have a chance to make a great deal more money than could be made by regularly breeding because they will multiply the negotiated royalties by the number of clones produced. It is projected that the number of clones produced could be as high as 16 based on the scientific advancements achieved since the cloning in 2003 of 3 mules by the same distinguished University of Idaho team that will do this cloning," said Kagel. Please see http://www.uidaho.edu/cloning/ for more information.

Kagel added, "The Jockey Club Rules prohibiting artificially inseminated and cloned race horses from competing are a house of cards and will fall, more likely sooner than later. A
Texas judge could rule soon that the rules violate Texas antitrust laws." (http://www.imakenews.com/broodmares/index000015980.cfm)

So in a nutshell the advantages of cloning your champion horse this season are:

1. You get the exact replica(s) of your horse, a walking patent unto itself;

2. You could negotiate royalties multiplied by the number of clones produced from your horse, whether cloned or bred, and/or from their competitive successes;

3. There is a one-time chance this season to clone your horse for $367,350 plus a patent royalty fee of 15% based on the number of clones produced and their estimated value. Even though no one can guarantee a specific result, you could hit the jackpot;

4. The Jockey Club Rules prohibiting racing clones and artificially inseminated horses is a house of cards that will fall to antitrust litigation and economic common sense, maybe sooner than later; and

5. It makes economic sense to clone any top-of-the-line horse, whether a race horse or not.

Kagel explained it's obvious why the Jockey Club Rules are bound to fall: "Cloned horses, being from the best blood lines, are much faster than run-of-the-mill race horses. An entrepreneur will step up to the plate and produce made-for-television-races pitting clones, even identical clones, against each other that will draw huge television audiences because people want to see the fastest and legendary horses race. Betting will occur on the internet through the numerous off shore gambling websites. Fans will stay away from the tracks in large numbers. The track owners will realize that they have been relegated to minor league status and then, facing a substantial lack of revenue, will embrace cloning and the Jockey Club Rules will be changed. It's always all about money in the long run."

Kagel concluded, "The deadline to sign for the only slot available for the entire world at http://www.horsecloning.com is August 15. We will broker your clones for you as well as putting your horse on our list for next season."

Contact:

Peter Kagel
305-304-0368
email: reminds@mindspring.com - please reference "horsecloning"

# # #

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

This is an interesting article on the law, economics and ethics of cloning horses.

This article from Harvard Law and Technology Journal, Spring 2006, is very long.  Click on the link for the full article.

 

This is the html version of the file http://jolt.law.harvard.edu/articles/pdf/v19/19HarvJLTech413.pdf.

G o o g l e automatically generates html versions of documents as we crawl the web.

To link to or bookmark this page, use the following url: http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:MTSnczRkdEMJ:jolt.law.harvard.edu/articles/pdf/v19/19HarvJLTech413.pdf+cloning+horses+Harvard+ethics&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=2&gl=us

 

The genetic engineering of animals is here.1Animal genetic engi-neering is already producing scientific breakthroughs in human healthcare and food production. Genetic engineering can mean huge profits for these industries, as well as for the sporting and pet retailindustries. Additionally, genetic engineering may assist in preventingthe extinction of endangered species. But, because of all the scientificand economic benefits of animal genetic engineering, its ethical im-plications risk being overlooked. Thorough evaluation of the merits ofgenetic engineering requires consideration of both the ethical and Page 1

Harvard Journal of Law & Technology Volume 19, Number 2 Spring 2006ECONOMICS AND ETHICS IN THE GENETIC ENGINEERING OF ANIMALSChad West*TABLE OF CONTENTSI. INTRODUCTION..............................................................................414II. USES OFANIMAL GENETICENGINEERING...................................415A. Healthcare................................................................................415B. Food Production Techniques...................................................417C. Pet Retail Industry ...................................................................418D. Sporting Industries...................................................................419E. Preservation of Endangered Species........................................424III. THERANGE OFETHICALCONCERNS IN ANIMALGENETICENGINEERING................................................................................425A. Animal Welfare ........................................................................426B. Anthropocentrism.....................................................................428C. Deep Ecology...........................................................................429IV. SOCIETY’S ETHICAL ANDECONOMIC VALUES ASREFLECTEDINCURRENTANIMALRIGHTS AND REGULATIONS.......................430A. State Laws................................................................................4301. Animals as Property ..............................................................4302. Animal Cruelty Laws ............................................................431B. Federal Laws............................................................................4331. Animal Welfare Act ..............................................................4332. Endangered Species Act........................................................434V. RECONCILING ETHICALCONCERNS AND ECONOMIC INTERESTS THROUGH FREE MARKET ENVIRONMENTALISM...........................436A. Free Market Environmentalism ...............................................436B. Balancing Economic and Ethical Concerns.............................438VI. CONCLUSION..............................................................................442* Texas Tech School of Law, candidate for Juris Doctorate, 2006; Webster University,MBA, 2001; Washington University in St. Louis, BBA, 1999. My thanks to Professors Susan Saab Fortney and Bill Jeffrey for their thorough comments on earlier drafts of this paper. E-mail: chad.a.west@ttu.edu.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

 

 

This page and website provided solely for educational and informational purposes.

L.Robinson,agent
site copyright ler 2004